At home work station

The Do’s and Don’ts of Working from Home:

Avoid common work from home mistakes and take the steps to make your day productive and pleasant with these working from home do’s and don’ts.   

Do: Wake up at your normal time and complete your normal morning routine.
Don’t: Sleep in just because you don’t have to worry about the commute or grabbing coffee before your morning meeting.
Why?: Keeping a normal morning routine is one way of helping yourself get into “work mode” instead of staying in “weekend mode”. This gives you the mental jumpstart you need to get into gear and rock your day.
 
Do: Get dressed as if you’re headed into the office.
Don’t: Stay in pajamas all day.
Why?: Getting dressed is another signal to yourself that you’re at work even when you’re technically at home. Also, if you spend the day in pajamas, what do you have to look forward to changing into at night?
 
Do: Be mindful about nourishment and hydration. 
Don’t: Neglect your needs or over-indulge in snacks.
Why?: Working from home gives us unusual access to our kitchen, pantry, and fridge. By resisting the temptation to snack out of boredom or neglect your body’s hunger you keep your energy levels up and your digestive system functioning optimally. And don’t forget to hydrate!
 
Do: Take regular breaks from looking at your computer screen.
Don’t: Insist on powering through an entire 8-hour day while staring directly at your computer screen.
Why?: Your eyes need a break! Avoid headaches and eye strain by making a point of focusing on distant objects for at least 20 seconds every 20 minutes to give your eyes a much-needed break. Blue light reducing computer glasses can also be helpful and, unlike in an office environment, you can finally wear them without being called a nerd.
 
Do: Set up a stationary workstation in your home.
Don’t: Work while in bed.
Why?: Your bed is a place of rest and refuge at the end of the day. It’s bad sleep hygiene to work in a place designed for rest. It’s also bad for your posture. Instead, take the time to set up an ergonomically optimized workspace that you can walk away from at the end of the day.
 
Do: Keep regular work hours- including breaks!
Don’t: Take 2 hours to cook lunch and then make up the lost time at the end of the day.
Why?: Yes, it might be appealing to make ravioli from scratch with the plan to work late in the evening, but you only undermine your concentration and your relaxation by blurring the boundaries between work and home. Stick to your usual schedule.
 
Do: Wrap up your day and check out completely. Go for a walk. Do a meditation. Change into sweatpants.
Don’t: Continue to work in the evening because you’re near your computer and can’t think of anything else to do.
Why: Checking out completely at the end of the day is the best way to ensure that you’ll feel fresh and ready for the next morning. Whatever makes you feel like you are done working is what you should do when you’re done working. If your workspace is in a highly visible area of the house take the time to shut down your computer, close your laptop, pack away your desk supplies to limit the lingering feeling of working in your home.
 
Do: Stay engaged socially.
Don’t: Let physical isolation send you into an emotional slump.
Why?: For many of us, talking with coworkers is the most consistent social interaction we get during the week. The sudden absence of those auxiliary conversations can lead to feelings of loneliness. If you’re working from home, consider that now might be the perfect time to catch up with old friends. Consider playing cooperative video games online or just having a skype call while you eat dinner. Your emotional health is a huge part of your overall wellbeing. Don’t neglect it.
 
What is all comes down to is this: find a routine that differentiates your time in “work mode” from “relaxation mode” and takes care of your needs without sacrificing comfort or productivity.
Do you have any work from home tips? Share them in the comments below!

1 comment

  • Great reminder for those of us recently forced to work remote. These are some good tips to exercises, practice, and help make for a successful new work environment transition.
    Thank you

    Dave on

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